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Distilled water: Healthy or dangerous ? A list of studies and articles..


Thursday, April 24 2003 - Filed under: General

Hi,

I continued the search today and checked the NCBI PubMed archive.
I did find several studies, but all are too old or in German or Russian, so no abstracts are available.
Perhaps I could find it through the University computers or the medical library..
Will let you know if I can find anything..

I do find it quite odd that there have been no studies the last three decades..

This one would be very interesting:

The effect of the mineral composition of drinking water on the health of the population (a review)
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10199069&dopt=Abstract

This study says that magnesium might be very essential in the water.. Alas no details..
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2260363&dopt=Abstract

This study says that drinking high-mineral water is bad for the health:
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2147992&dopt=Abstract

>It has been established that drinking highly mineralized water is a
>high-intensity factor producing an untoward effect on the children's
>physical development, contributing to the rise of the incidence of acute
>(mainly respiratory) and chronic diseases (cholecystopathies,
>nephropathies, gastrointestinal diseases, nocturnal enuresis, dental
>caries). The long consumption of such drinking water has been discovered
>to have an unfavourable effect on the physicochemical and biochemical
>properties of the urine, excretion of the main crystal-forming
>substances and certain parameters of mebranolysis.

Estimations of daily mineral intakes from drinking water.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7129962&dopt=Abstract
>Although the mineral concentrations in water samples were generally
>very low some subjects received 10 per cent or more of their recommended
>dietary intake of Cu and Zn from this source

This one would be interesting too:
Cardiovascular disease and the mineral content of drinking water.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=5543162&dopt=Abstract

My first conclusion after this search is that there is no convincing proof whatsoever that low-mineral water or distilled water would be unhealthy.
However, there is at least some evidence that high-mineral water *is* unhealthy.
There is also noted that some of the minerals in the water are absorbed, notable zinc and copper, but the question of course is if this is from organic or inorganic minerals. Furthermore it's only 10% maximum, so at least 90% is coming from the food.
Mineral deficiencies should thus not easily occur just because of the absence of minerals in the drinking water.. If the food doesn't supply it, then it might give problems a bit earlier.

I also find it interesting that there are many Russian studies on the effects (often healing effects) of drinking low-mineral water for different ailments, among which intestinal problems..
It would be very interesting to read those studies.

Here are the titles, but most studies don't have the abstract, as they are too old or in German, Russian or French:
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov:80/entrez/query.fcgi?SUBMIT=y&term=drinking%5BTitle%20Word%5D%20AND%20water%5BTitle%20Word%5D%20AND%20mineral%5BTitle%20Word%5D&db=PubMed

Very strange: Virtually no American or English studies to be found on this topic..

For those who can read German, here is an interesting article on distilled and low-mineral water:
www.wasserwissen.de/Mineralien/Aquadest/aquadest.htm

The German forums also contain many interesting articles and discussions:
groups.google.com/groups?q=destilliertes+wasser+gesundheit&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=utf-8&sa=N&tab=wg

And here is a german FAQ on distilled water:
groups.google.com/groups?q=destilliertes+wasser+gesundheit&start=10&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=utf-8&selm=4egmbg%2417h6%40majestix.uni-muenster.de&rnum=11

An interesting observation I found is that distilled water *is* dangerous when injected in the blood, but not at all when drunk.
The kidneys are very efficient and only throw out the excess minerals in the blood.
If it would be dangerous, then my mineral water would be dangerous also at only 30mg per liter. Many people without proper tap water drink mineral water daily all over the world and many mineral waters are quite low in minerals.
It would be quite strange if the small change of 10-30 mg per liter would make such a big difference..
What is 100 mg of different salts, when compared to eating an egg or an avocado or whatever natural food. It's nothing. 100g of avocado supplies 600mg of potassium..
100 grams of certain cheeses give almost a whole gram of calcium.

If your health would depend on that several miligrams of inorganic minerals, you're eating a really bad diet, I would say.

One aspect of distilled water, which I can't comprehend fully, is the high energy content.. I don't know exactly what kind of implications that property has. According to Reams only positive and when considering the experience of people drinking it for decades, one would think he was right..
But true proof will never be found if it's healthy in the long run, just like it's very difficult to prove that living near a nuclear plant or under high voltage wires is dangerous over time..

I discovered that most shops that sell distillers are ripping off the customers.. I yesterday ordered mine for $99 and I found the exact same model with another name tag, being sold for over 300 euro's (more than 300 dollars) in Europe.. Nice margins :-)

If anyone has access to the studies (or comparable studies) above, please let me know.. I would really like to read them.. Russian translators are welcome too :-)

Greetings from The Netherlands,

Ed

Update February 2010
Randy Johnson sent me an interesting article he wrote:

Health Effects Of Drinking Distilled Water
www.cyber-nook.com/water/distilledwater.htm

His conclusion, after reviewing many studies, is that no evidence of harmful effects can be found. Evidence of positive effects can't be found either by the way.





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