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How DMSO only relieves symptoms, whereas copper deficiency might be the primary cause


Friday, March 08 2002 - Filed under: General

>Ed,
>
>Interesting, since a copper deficiency allows iron to build up in
>tissues. Copper is needed to produce the enzyme that is used to get iron
>OUT of intestinal tissues. I would suspect that SCD would be DETRIMENTAL
>to people who react positively to DMSO - since SCD is HIGH zinc - which
>prohibits copper absorption.
>
>People with low copper can actually accumulate iron, but still suffer from
>anemia - the iron accumulates in tissues and can't get into the blood
>stream. So you see, Ed, taking DMSO is treating a symptom, but taking
>copper may be getting at the root of the problem.
>

Hi Marj,

You're right: DMSO is only treating a symptom.. Every so often (months) a new dose of DMSO is needed to get rid of the inflammation again..
So, it doesn't treat the primary problem.. It would be very interesting to check the mineral levels of people where the DMSO helps.

I've also been thinking about a fault in the human design.. During inflammation, the iron is left in the intestines, so it's not absorbed. That's because bacteria can only thrive when enough iron is available. I wonder if the body has a exception-situation planned for when an inflammation hits the intestines ? If not, then the iron is left *in* the intestines, exactly at the spot where the bacteria need the iron.. Perhaps, inflammation of the intestines was not considered when evolution designed our immune system. Perhaps because it never was a problem, because we haven't eaten grains and high-carb ever in evolution, except for the last 10,000 years.

Thanks for the interesting info.. If you don't mind, I'd like to archive this message on my site, so I can look it up later..

Ed,
The Netherlands





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